Training for Healthcare Professionals

Family-based treatment for eating disorders: compassion and care through the storm of phase 1

For families, recognizing an eating disorder in their teen can be an overwhelming and scary discovery. Parents are often filled with questions and doubts, “Is this a phase? Will it go away on its own? What can I do? What should I do?” In the current talk, we will discuss how family-based therapy for eating disorders works to help teens recover. We will also discuss the important role of individual therapists and primary care providers as they work together with family-based therapists. Applying concrete skills and vignettes, this webinar will illustrate the principles of helping families and teens face eating disorder recovery with courage and compassion.

Webinar Details

Audience: Primary care and behavioral health providers serving children, adolescents, and young adults
Duration: 1 hour
Cost: Free
Credit: 1 CE Credit or Certificate of completion 

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the three phases of family-based therapy for eating disorders.
  • Assess whether a family is a good candidate for family-based therapy for eating disorders.
  • Apply principles of family-based therapy to hypothetical case vignettes.
  • Describe self-compassion mindsets that could help both parents and teens with eating disorders as they work towards normalizing the eating pattern.

Registration and CE Credit

Please complete the registration form before watching the webinar. 

The National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. NCEED maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

If you have questions, contact us at info@nceedus.org

Presenter

Stephanie Zerwas Headshot
Stephanie Zerwas, PhD

Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Psychiatry

 

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